Frequently Asked Questions on Bedridden


What are bedsores?

Bedsores are common in bedridden patients who cannot move on their own. A bedsore is the breakdown of the skin or a wound over a bony surface. Ulcers develop due to reduced blood supply to the skin over a period of time, caused primarily by lying or sitting in the same position. Other causes of bedsores may include 

  • Creases in the bedsheet 
  • Friction when a person is dragged and not lifted or turned in the right manner
  • Poor blood circulation
  • Poor nutrition
  • Constant pressure against a particular area of the body 
What is the treatment for bedsores?
Treatment of bedsores include
  • Reducing pressure on the affected skin by selecting mattresses that reduce pressure on the skin.

  • Caring for the wounds with appropriate wound dressings 

  • Controlling pain

  • Preventing infection with regular dressing changes 

  • Maintaining good nutrition

Which areas are mostly prone to bedsores or pressure ulcers?

Areas prone to bedsores are back of the head, shoulder, elbow, lower back and buttocks, hip, inner knees or heels.

What should be done to ensure proper personal hygiene of bedridden patients?
  • Protect the bed with a special hygienic underpad 
  • Start the bath by washing the face, and then wash the ears and the neck with 
  • Turn the person to one side to wash his or her back
  • Take care to clean between the toes when washing the feet
  • Protect the areas exposed to chafes and bedsores using special protective creams along with dressings
  • Use incontinence products like diapers or briefs if the patient is not able to go to the toilet.
  • Do not forget brushing the teeth, combing and shaving.
How are transfer systems helpful to bedridden patients?

Bedridden patients with some upper body strength may require transfers from bed to toilet or shower chair, bed to wheelchair and vice versa. Transfer systems provide an easy way to do such transfers without much effort on the part of the caregiver.