Frequently Asked Questions on Patient Lifts


What is the difference between a floor lift and a stand assist lift?

Floor lifts or total lifts are used when patients cannot bear weight on their legs and can provide minimal assistance during the lift and transfer (more dependent). These lifts are used to transfer a patient from one room to another. Stand assist lifts are used for pivot transfers from a bed to chair or commode and vice versa. Stand assist lifts are recommended for patients who can bear weight on at least one leg and have some upper body strength (less dependent).

Why is the number of hooks on the spreader bar important?

Using a 6-point spreader bar attachments is advisable because 6 connecting points to the spreader bar is safer than traditional 2 or 4 point hookups. In addition to the 6 point system the patient girth is spread over a wider area ultimately allowing for a much more comfortable lifting experience.

What is a full body lift?

Total body lifts are used to transfer patients/residents from a bed to a wheelchair, toilet chair, bathtub, commode, etc. or vice versa. A total body lift is typically used with patients who cannot bear weight, have physical limitations (quadriplegia, amputee), or are very heavy and cannot be safely transferred manually by staff. A portable total lift supports the entire weight of the resident with a sling attached to a stand on wheels that can be freely moved or positioned to allow a transfer to a different surface.

Who should use a full body lift?

Total body lifts can be used with bariatric patients, or for those who cannot bear weight on their legs e.g. quadraplegics, amputees or people who do not possess physical strength due to a disease.

What are the uses of a patient lift?

Patient lifts are very versatile as they allow for patients to be transferred between many surfaces such as beds, wheelchairs, commodes, bath tubs or other places throughout home or healthcare facility. They use electric or hydraulic energy to safety lift patients with limited mobility or the ability to transfer on their own and relocate them while keeping them comfortable.

What are the risks associated with the use of patient lifts?

Improper use of patient lifts can result in injury. Always consult the user manual and/or any documentation that comes with your patient lift as well as lift sling, and if you have questions or concerns, consult your doctor/caregiver or supplier of the lift.